Las Vegas Sun

October 1, 2014

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Letter to the editor:

Stage was set for education failures

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I hope everyone saw the news. This state’s schools are rated the worst in the country. Overload the classrooms and continue to put down the teachers. Cut the funding. Then try to lure new business to this state. Get real.

The schools will continue to get worse until the people who “have” step up and take the lead to properly fund the schools. If you want the best, you have to pay for it.

The casinos and the mining industry have bled this state dry. Now we are paying for it.

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  1. "The only thing more expensive than education is ignorance."

    Benjamin Franklin Quotes

  2. 3 suggestions: Charter schools, home schooling and school vouchers. Nevada has tried everything else and it hasn't worked. When you're last, at the bottom of the heap, what do we have to lose?

    CarmineD

  3. The public school system is awash in money. It just chooses (or, in some court-ordered ways, is forced) to use the funds in nonproductive ways. Busing is a prime example. When did it become the taxpayers job to pay for getting the rug-rats to school and not the parents? Making parents do their job would save millions. Then there is the over reliance on what I refer to as "Modern Day Witch Doctors:" counselors, psychologists and psychiatrists. Little Jimmy scrapes a knee and some over paid counseler kisses it to make it "feel better?" Little wonder we have so many wimps. Let the kid cry. He'll get over it in no time and be wiser and more careful in the future. Geting rid of the "Modern Day Witch Doctors" would save additional millions. And, I haven't even raised the issue of bloated administrative positions. The public school system sucks and has for more than 5 decades. It's long past time to give it an honorable burial and move on to real education, not indoctrination.

  4. Looks like CarmineD and Jeff have the best starting point worked. You could bill Mexico or other countries of origin for tutoring the non English speaking students. Move the nonfunctional students to special needs schools.

  5. I would guess the big question is what are other states doing that we are not doing about our school problems? We have ranked at near bottom and now at the very bottom for many years for the worst school performance in the country.

    Maybe our officials don't regard our years of being at the bottom of the heap, in our schools as a pressing issue. Is this something that we need to have open discussions about in trying to find ways to improve our schools? Surely our students and teachers deserve better.What's the fix? Someone has to have some good idea's for a solution to the lowest position in the country for our schools?

  6. Why stop at looking at what other States are doing? We also need to look at other countries who are producing graduates in the fields of science, engineering, technology, and mathematics. The US is so in need of high level education, and seeking to attract graduates to our shores by giving them priority immigration status.

    We cannot focus only on education without a commitment to changing the economic and social disparity of our country.

    At this point, I'm wondering if a major shift in financial commitment will have to be made to change the future of this country for the better.

    Only when we can see the interconnect of all the areas of influence, and find a model that will serve the purpose for the good of our youth and country will we be able to rise from the ashes. It will take a good deal of courage to do such a thing.

    We cannot afford to abandon and leave behind those who are disadvantaged. That group is growing.

    I will go out on a limb now with the Liberty Crusaders and say that we should go to standard uniforms for all students in all schools, including teachers dressing in a professional manner, whether as a form of uniform or well tailored modest outfit. Dress establishes some equality and expectations.

    Discipline, and I don't mean rulers on the hands, is an absolute necessity, as is respect for teacher and students.

    If there is chronic disruption by some students, they should be removed from the schools and placed in one that has staff who have the skill and talent to turn them around.

    Special needs classes/schools are also needed to help students achieve the most they are able according to their capacity.

    ESL classes are not the only effort that must be made. There won't be much success if the ESL students don't have many opportunities outside of class to speak English. Just as students learning a second language will not learn much in the long run if they have no real life experience conversing with others who speak the language.

    I am now bilingual because I learned that I had to live two languages. It is not uncommon for Europeans to know and speak 3-5 different languages. There are many advantages now and for the future.

    In NV, we should have a growing bilingual society, but we don't utilize the opportunity that is before us.

    I am certain that my thoughts will bring much disagreement, and to that I say, "OK, keep your heads in the sand and you won't get much more than sand fleas." Our youth and nation deserve better than that.

  7. For those who are interested in seeing the comparisons of different countries in education, this link provides a jumping off point for research in the school systems.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/...